A Travellerspoint blog

October 2012

Day Exploring Central Park

<b style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); line-height: 20px; font-family: &quot;Titling Gothic FB Narr&quot;, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; box-sizing: border-box; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%;"> Central Park - so much to see!

Obelisk:</b><br style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); line-height: 20px; font-family: &quot;Titling Gothic FB Narr&quot;, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; box-sizing: border-box; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%;">This 3,500-year-old monument stands directly behind the Metropolitan Museum of Art. To celebrate the 30th year of his reign, Egyptian pharaoh Thutmosis III (c. 1479-1425 B.C.) commissioned a pair of obelisks for the sacred city of Heliopolis. In 12 B.C., they were moved to Alexandria, where they stood until the 19th century, when all great cities around the world clamored for an ancient Egyptian obelisk. The Khedive of Egypt gave one obelisk to England in 1879 and the other to America in 1881, in exchange for foreign aid to modernize his country. <br style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); line-height: 20px; font-family: &quot;Titling Gothic FB Narr&quot;, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; box-sizing: border-box; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%;"><br style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); line-height: 20px; font-family: &quot;Titling Gothic FB Narr&quot;, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; box-sizing: border-box; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%;">On a snowy January 22, 1881, thousands of proud New Yorkers celebrated the turning of Central Park's 220-ton obelisk (nicknamed “Cleopatra's Needle”) to an upright position. The renowned filmmaker Cecil B. DeMille, who fondly remembered playing in the area as a boy, donated the plaques that translate the hieroglyphics.

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Lots of Things to See

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First Human Maiden from clay 1936/cast bronze

First Human Maiden from clay 1936/cast bronze

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NYC Bus to USS Intrepid Museum

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I love New York!

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Federal Hall in New York City</b> was home to Congress for a total of about four years. It's where Washington had his inauguration as the first President of the United States. In fact, when the First United States Congress met there in 1789, the first thing they did was tally the votes that would declare Washington Commander in Chief. In turn, Washington declared that a permanent housing solution for the frequently-traveling lawmakers was in order. You can still see Federal Hall to this day, by the way "“ it's on Wall Street and there's a big statue of George out in front. The Bible he was sworn in on is still there.

Wall Street

Wall Street


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George Washington, Federal Hall

George Washington, Federal Hall


Plague at Federal Hall

Plague at Federal Hall


Charging Bull of Wall Street

Charging Bull of Wall Street

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Brooklyn Bridge

Building the Brooklyn Bridge is an extremely interesting story, particularly because the bridge was completed basically by hand and on a scale that had never been done before.

The construction took 14 years and killed the main architect, John Roebling a month after it had begun. A case of the benz crippled his son Washington after he had taken over the project, while spending too much time underwater overseeing the construction of the base of the bridge. Washington completed the project despite not being able to leave his house for the last 11 years of the construction, only able to view the bridge from his bedroom window and using his wife Emily to relay information. Overall, 27 people died and a couple of major scandals almost derailed the project.

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